PEACE PROBE by Gene Stoltzfus


The Parable of Robert McNamara by peaceprobe

The Parable of Robert MacNamara
There once was a very smart man who built cars and figured out ways for big organizations like governments and businesses to do things better.  He had what a lot of people called a liberal sense of morality towards the world.  Many people were liberal at that time.  He wanted to do good and make things better, more democratic.  He was a good father who welcomed friends of his children into his home even when they demonstrated against the big military system that he supervised.
At the beginning of the reign of JFK, the emperor called him in Detroit where he was making cars.  Emperor JFK asked him to oversee the Defence of the Empire.  He replied that he was not trained to take on such a responsibility.  The emperor told him there is no school that prepares people for these jobs.  So Robert MacNamara like many people of his time went to Babylon to serve the people with the best intentions.  He wanted to do good, make things more efficient, save the people’s money, and create systems where there was a better chance for good decisions.
His country was about to enter a very big war in a little known area of the world, Viet Nam.  The country was already locked in a very hot fight that had the strange name, Cold War.  When he took up his job as Defence Secretary his generals believed that if that Cold War went nuclear there must be massive retaliation and as much of the enemy as possible should be destroyed.  Within a few years he realized that such massive retaliation might lead to a terrible outcome, mutually assured destruction.  So he started looking for ways to trim the atomic weapons.  Also in the year of our Lord 1963 Robert MacNamara ordered the entire defence system to implement Equal Opportunity for All Minorities.  Because of the order the military became the most integrated unit in all of the empire, ahead of churches, restaurants, and businesses.
But sadly most of his time went into that old fashioned war at the edge of the empire.  He was a loyal servant of the emperors of the time and tried his best to understand the enemy.  Despite misgivings he sent 535,000 soldiers and air planes to that distant land to decimate villages, and  roads – anything that would kill or destroy the enemy’s spirit.  But bombs, chemicals and killing only made the enemy stronger and smarter. One and a quarter million people in that land, more than the population of the capital of the empire, were killed during his time.  He travelled to that distant land many times and tried to be nice to the people.  Even that didn’t work very well.  One time when he left Viet Nam he tried to say “Long Live Viet Nam” in the local language.  His tones and accent was severely lacking and what he said was “Viet Nam wants to lie down”.
Robert liked good information.  He felt like he failed to understand the enemy so he invented something called counter insurgency, a collection of programs intended to make the enemy like his people and the empire’s other allies.  It didn’t work very well.  The intelligence people around him couldn’t get the right information.  Even if they found information they didn’t know how to separate truth from falsehood. They got into the habit of buying and trading information although they never actually went so far as to commercialize it on Wall Street.  Even expensive information was not very reliable.
One time he said, war is “impossible” to win.   He hinted that if his country had lost World War II the people who engineered the bombing in that war may have been prosecuted for genocidal destruction.  But Robert, like the liberals of his day, persisted despite their troubled consciences.  He did not resign his work or speak out except many years later when from hindsight he identified his doubts and mistakes.  Many blamed him for defeat.  Many more blamed him for overseeing the overwhelming outrage of that war.
His country would not be the same again.  The nations of the earth would no longer trust the good intentions of his country’s people.  When the war finally ended seven years after he stopped serving the emperor, his country was tired and spent.  People did not utter the word, Viet Nam.  No one said defeat, not even Robert, but almost everyone knew that they had been part of a dreadful epic fight where something had gone horribly wrong.  And the people pushed their pain, confusion and guilt deep inside themselves where it festered and made them sick.
Robert MacNamara died this week at age 93 and people are unsure how they should remember him.  Some people used to think that the world  had set a limit to war beyond which the empire dare not go because of the moral outrage surrounding Robert’s war.  But now 40 years later it seems like those limits have not been learned or honoured.  Others in the empire, those who wanted Robert to send more troops and bombs, believe that the innovations and organization that Robert brought to war, counter insurgency, military might, tricks of the intelligence community and electronic barriers to the enemy still can make things come out right.
Some people search their belief system, and their confidence in the great myths of the time wanes.  In these days like in the days of Robert MacNamara a new emperor has been crowned and the people want things to turn out better.  They want to believe that they are a special righteous race who deserve prosperity.  And the new emperor tells the people what they want to hear.  Hope is mixed with warnings and forgetfulness.
The Emperor’s soldiers of the new age are turning to smarter bombs, better missiles, and more intelligent machines called robots.  But these don’t bring victory.  Others have turned to nonviolence, an old  force but newly discovered by those who resisted Robert.  Even non-violence is studied for ways it can be used or manipulated for imperial ends.  Bits and pieces are borrowed  but disembodied nonviolent tactics are lifeless without authentic love, a vision for transformation and conviction behind them.
The Emperor and his entourage two generations after Robert still can not find a way to explain to the world why a big powerful country would pound the life out of very poor people.  The enemy is still described as a terrorist.  But some people of the world have become wiser and they know the real meaning of terrorist.   They use the term terrorist for those who operate the foxy new robotic weapons, missiles and smart bombs in the same breath as surprise attacks from below by people who build road side bombs and use hi-jacked air planes as missiles to destroy great buildings.
The people of the world remain restless about the empire. And at home, out of sight of the great weapons factories, polished floors of lobbyist offices, and defence contractors, all those who live from the fruits Robert’s systems, there are bands of street people and broken lives now made even worse by hard times.
Robert MacNamara is about to be buried.  An aging street person in Colombus, Ohio limps past the statue of another Emperor, William McKinley assassinated 102 years before JFK.  The street person fought bravely for the empire, and remembers the day that Robert sent him off to battle.  He curses and talking to no one in particular asks if the lessons from Robert’s time will be buried with him.

There once was a very smart man who built cars and figured out ways for big organizations like governments and businesses to do things better.  He had what a lot of people called a liberal sense of morality towards the world.  Many people were liberal at that time.  He wanted to do good and make things better, more democratic.  He was a good father who welcomed friends of his children into his home even when they demonstrated against the big military system that he supervised.

At the beginning of the reign of JFK, the emperor called him in Detroit where he was making cars.  Emperor JFK asked him to oversee the Defence of the Empire.  He replied that he was not trained to take on such a responsibility.  The emperor told him there is no school that prepares people for these jobs.  So Robert McNamara like many people of his time went to Babylon to serve the people with the best intentions.  He wanted to do good, make things more efficient, save the people’s money, and create systems where there was a better chance for good decisions.

His country was about to enter a very big war in a little known area of the world, Viet Nam.  The country was already locked in a very hot fight that had the strange name, Cold War.  When he took up his job as Defence Secretary his generals believed that if that Cold War went nuclear there must be massive retaliation and as much of the enemy as possible should be destroyed.  Within a few years he realized that such massive retaliation might lead to a terrible outcome, mutually assured destruction.  So he started looking for ways to trim the atomic weapons. Also in the year of our Lord 1963 Robert McNamara ordered the entire defence system to implement Equal Opportunity for All Minorities. Because of the order the military became the most integrated unit in all of the empire, ahead of churches, restaurants, and businesses.

But sadly most of his time went into that old fashioned war at the edge of the empire.  He was a loyal servant of the emperors of the time and tried his best to understand the enemy.  Despite misgivings he sent 535,000 soldiers and air planes to that distant land to decimate villages, and roads – anything that would kill or destroy the enemy’s spirit.  But bombs, chemicals and killing only made the enemy stronger and smarter. One and a quarter million people in that land, more than the population of the capital of the empire, were killed during his time.  He travelled to that distant land many times and tried to be nice to the people.  Even that didn’t work very well.  One time when he left Viet Nam he tried to say “Long Live Viet Nam” in the local language.  His tones and accent was severely lacking and what he said was “Viet Nam wants to lie down”.

Robert liked good information.  He felt like he failed to understand the enemy so he invented something called counter insurgency, a collection of programs intended to make the enemy like his people and the empire’s other allies.  It didn’t work very well.  The intelligence people around him couldn’t get the right information.  Even if they found information they didn’t know how to separate truth from falsehood. They got into the habit of buying and trading information although they never actually went so far as to commercialize it on Wall Street.  Even expensive information was not very reliable.

One time he said, war is “impossible” to win.   He hinted that if his country had lost World War II the people who engineered the bombing in that war may have been prosecuted for genocidal destruction.  But Robert, like the liberals of his day, persisted despite their troubled consciences.  He did not resign his work or speak out except many years later when from hindsight he identified his doubts and mistakes.  Many blamed him for defeat.  Many more blamed him for overseeing the overwhelming outrage of that war.

His country would not be the same again.  The nations of the earth would no longer trust the good intentions of his country’s people.  When the war finally ended seven years after he stopped serving the emperor, his country was tired and spent.  People did not utter the word, Viet Nam. No one said defeat, not even Robert, but almost everyone knew that they had been part of a dreadful epic fight where something had gone horribly wrong.  And the people pushed their pain, confusion and guilt deep inside themselves where it festered and made them sick.

Robert McNamara died this week at age 93 and people are unsure how they should remember him.  Some people used to think that the world had set a limit to war beyond which the empire dare not go because of the moral outrage surrounding Robert’s war.  But now 40 years later it seems like those limits have not been learned or honoured.  Others in the empire, those who wanted Robert to send more troops and bombs, believe that the innovations and organization that Robert brought to war, counter insurgency, military might, tricks of the intelligence community and electronic barriers to the enemy still can make things come out right.

Some people search their belief system, and their confidence in the great myths of the time wanes.  In these days like in the days of Robert McNamara a new emperor has been crowned and the people want things to turn out better.  They want to believe that they are a special righteous race who deserve prosperity.  And the new emperor tells the people what they want to hear.  Hope is mixed with warnings and forgetfulness.

The Emperor’s soldiers of the new age are turning to smarter bombs, better missiles, and more intelligent machines called robots.  But these don’t bring victory.  Others have turned to nonviolence, an old  force but newly discovered by those who resisted Robert.  Even non-violence is studied for ways it can be used or manipulated for imperial ends.  Bits and pieces are borrowed  but disembodied nonviolent tactics are lifeless without authentic love, a vision for transformation and conviction behind them.

The Emperor and his entourage two generations after Robert still can not find a way to explain to the world why a big powerful country would pound the life out of very poor people.  The enemy is still described as a terrorist.  But some people of the world have become wiser and they know the real meaning of terrorist.   They use the term terrorist for those who operate the foxy new robotic weapons, missiles and smart bombs in the same breath as surprise attacks from below by people who build road side bombs and use hi-jacked air planes as missiles to destroy great buildings.

The people of the world remain restless about the empire. And at home, out of sight of the great weapons factories, polished floors of lobbyist offices, and defence contractors, all those who live from the fruits Robert’s systems, there are bands of street people and broken lives now made even worse by hard times.

Robert McNamara is about to be buried.  An aging street person in Colombus, Ohio limps past the statue of another Emperor, William McKinley assassinated 102 years before JFK.  The street person fought bravely for the empire, and remembers the day that Robert sent him off to battle.  He curses and talking to no one in particular asks if the lessons from Robert’s time will be buried with him.

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2 Comments so far
Leave a comment

This is very moving gene. There’s no word yesterday on TV about this man, as if he was so unimportant to the history of the empire. But full of Michael Jackson. Seems people are inured to serious commentary, and are insatiable with entertainment hoopla.

carry on! Len

Comment by peaceprobe

Gene, it was so good to see you in Columbus. I wish there would have been time to talk more. I’m keeping up with your blog and want to stay in touch about your work/actions regarding the digital war. Let’s stay in touch! Joe

Comment by Joe Roos




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