PEACE PROBE by Gene Stoltzfus


THE END OF PACIFISM AS WE KNOW IT by peaceprobe

 

THE END OF PACIFISM AS WE KNOW IT
In theatres of war where I have worked I have met people who don’t want to participate any longer.  In Colombia I talked with paramilitary soldiers seeking ways out of their previous commitments because the killing they have seen is so distasteful.  Israeli soldiers have built a succession of organizations and support groups for persons not wishing to participate in specific wars.  In Iraq I met former Iraqi soldiers who opted out of military service with great difficulty.  
For these people their own participation in war was the trigger that unleashed a flood of personal questions about war making in general and witnessing against the sources of war.  For some the flood of questions leading to new vision was set off by spiritual conversion.  Despite the modern tendency among popular Christianity to link religious life with national purpose and militarism, people find a peace position often from their own study of the Bible.  
Twenty years ago I was contacted by a person who was curious about Christian Peacemaker Teams. He wished to become involved and support the work.  He had just resigned from a job in a corporation that was heavily involved in military contracts and he wanted to do something “positive”.  We talked several times and eventually he helped to develop our internet based work.  From time to time I had to call him at very inconvenient times of the day and night so he could make critical information available on the internet regarding a crisis event.  He never once complained about my disruptive calls despite his own work and family obligations.  He always wanted to do more and made me feel like I was doing him a favour by providing a route for him to effectively make use of the energy that was released within him when he made his decision to take pacifism to a new level in his personal life and career.
Another friend, a pastor told me of a dilemma that entered his life.  He had been a supervisor for fuelling airlanes at a regional airport.  His job included providing fuel for private planes of companies who stored their executive aircraft at a regional airport.  Over time he realized he was providing gasoline to fuel a US military contractor whose work was shrouded in mystery.  He needed work. One day the contractor demanded that he put more fuel in the airplane than regulations allowed.  He refused to do so but was ordered to comply by his superior because the contract was very important to the small airport.  He complied but over the next year and a half he continued to ponder his dilemma, being a peacemaker who fuelled jets that managed the delivery of modern weapons.  Eventually he resigned.
People often approach me when I travel to discuss a career dilemma where family income depends upon design, development or fabricating the instruments of violence.  Sometimes the discussion is not ready for decision.  At other times it is.  Those decisions always intersect with questions of economic survival, ethics, and peacemaking.  Pacifist churches, meetings and associations are not exempt from these emotional and  life changing opportunities for taking a decisive stand.  People who are facing hard decisions know very well that any decisions they make will affect all their relationships for good and bad.  What they don’t know and what I can only vaguely explain is that wide margins of new energy and creativity often follow decisions of dissent when the voice of conscience is acknowledged and acted upon.
Pacifism is not a static condition or position. I have recently learned that the word pacifism comes from two Latin root words through the French word pacifisme.  Pac is traced back to the Latin word, Pax that means peace or harmony.  Fism derives from the suffix ficus which comes from the Latin ficere that means to act or take action.  In the Bible the Greek word eirenopoios (peacemakers, Matthew 5:9) is translated into Latin as pacifici, which means those who work for peace.  Though in our day we tend to abstract ideas from actual living, the original meaning of pacifist was to be an active peacemaker.  A pacifist inherently takes action.  
Pacifism rejects the use of violent means despite the fact that the tree of violence reaches through contract and contractor into the main streets of most of our communities.  The contradiction inherent in modern economy brings the production, ideological formation and general culture of violence inside our homes and work life.  At one time it may have been possible to be a wedge into the organized violent suppression of violence by simply refusing military service. For most of us that expression of pacifism, refusal to join the military, is no longer the only critical boundary for a life of peacemaking. However, in some countries, like Israel, Colombia and Iraq the decision not to participate in the military is still the flashpoint.  In systems where there is no longer a draft the decision by active duty soldiers to get out because of moral convictions  is often transforming and costly.  
There are three possible responses to violence to which we are connected in Afghanistan, Iraq and Cleveland, violent opposition, passivity, or militant nonviolence.  The active even militant nonviolence inherent in pacifism transforms life from static hum drum and rules, to dynamic engagement with the power of active living. In the Bible peacemakers (the Latin translation used the term pacifist) are called Blessed.   
To be Blessed according to Roman Catholic tradition is to be beatified and worthy of veneration.  Perhaps not everyone who does peacemaking wants to be beatified by the Roman Church or venerated.  However the root meaning of pacifism, peacemaking with all the release of energy that it implies, still holds.  Being pacifist is not a rigid formula for action.  Pacifism is the awakened conscience and the willingness to act on it sometimes alone, but preferably with some support.  The blessing is inherent in the action itself, and the surprise that follows.   
 

In theatres of war where I have worked I have met people who don’t want to participate any longer.  In Colombia I talked with paramilitary soldiers seeking ways out of their previous commitments because the killing they have seen is so distasteful.  Israeli soldiers have built a succession of organizations and support groups for persons not wishing to participate in specific wars.  In Iraq I met former Iraqi soldiers who opted out of military service with great difficulty.  

For these people their own participation in war was the trigger that unleashed a flood of personal questions about war making in general and witnessing against the sources of war.  For some the flood of questions leading to new vision was set off by spiritual conversion.  Despite the modern tendency among popular Christianity to link religious life with national purpose and militarism, people find a peace position often from their own study of the Bible.  

Twenty years ago I was contacted by a person who was curious about Christian Peacemaker Teams. He wished to become involved and support the work.  He had just resigned from a job in a corporation that was heavily involved in military contracts and he wanted to do something “positive”.  We talked several times and eventually he helped to develop our internet based work.  From time to time I had to call him at very inconvenient times of the day and night so he could make critical information available on the internet regarding a crisis event.  He never once complained about my disruptive calls despite his own work and family obligations.  He always wanted to do more and made me feel like I was doing him a favour by providing a route for him to effectively make use of the energy that was released within him when he made his decision to take pacifism to a new level in his personal life and career.

Another friend, a pastor told me of a dilemma that entered his life.  He had been a supervisor for fuelling airlanes at a regional airport.  His job included providing fuel for private planes of companies who stored their executive aircraft at a regional airport.  Over time he realized he was providing gasoline to fuel a US military contractor whose work was shrouded in mystery.  He needed work. One day the contractor demanded that he put more fuel in the airplane than regulations allowed.  He refused to do so but was ordered to comply by his superior because the contract was very important to the small airport.  He complied but over the next year and a half he continued to ponder his dilemma, being a peacemaker who fuelled jets that managed the delivery of modern weapons.  Eventually he resigned.

People often approach me when I travel to discuss a career dilemma where family income depends upon design, development or fabricating the instruments of violence.  Sometimes the discussion is not ready for decision.  At other times it is.  Those decisions always intersect with questions of economic survival, ethics, and peacemaking.  Pacifist churches, meetings and associations are not exempt from these emotional and  life changing opportunities for taking a decisive stand.  People who are facing hard decisions know very well that any decisions they make will affect all their relationships for good and bad.  What they don’t know and what I can only vaguely explain is that wide margins of new energy and creativity often follow decisions of dissent when the voice of conscience is acknowledged and acted upon.

Pacifism is not a static condition or position. I have recently learned that the word pacifism comes from two Latin root words through the French word pacifisme.  Pac is traced back to the Latin word, Pax that means peace or harmony.  Fism derives from the suffix ficus which comes from the Latin ficere that means to act or take action.  In the Bible the Greek word eirenopoios (peacemakers, Matthew 5:9) is translated into Latin as pacifici, which means those who work for peace.  Though in our day we tend to abstract ideas from actual living, the original meaning of pacifist was to be an active peacemaker.  A pacifist inherently takes action.  

Pacifism rejects the use of violent means despite the fact that the tree of violence reaches through contract and contractor into the main streets of most of our communities.  The contradiction inherent in modern economy brings the production, ideological formation and general culture of violence inside our homes and work life.  At one time it may have been possible to be a wedge into the organized violent suppression of violence by simply refusing military service. For most of us that expression of pacifism, refusal to join the military, is no longer the only critical boundary for a life of peacemaking. However, in some countries, like Israel, Colombia and Iraq the decision not to participate in the military is still the flashpoint.  In systems where there is no longer a draft the decision by active duty soldiers to get out because of moral convictions  is often transforming and costly. 

There are three possible responses to violence to which we are connected in Afghanistan, Iraq and Cleveland, violent opposition, passivity, or militant nonviolence.  The active even militant nonviolence inherent in pacifism transforms life from static hum drum and rules, to dynamic engagement with the power of active living. In the Bible peacemakers (the Latin translation used the term pacifist) are called Blessed.   

To be Blessed according to Roman Catholic tradition is to be beatified and worthy of veneration.  Perhaps not everyone who does peacemaking wants to be beatified by the Roman Church or venerated.  However the root meaning of pacifism, peacemaking with all the release of energy that it implies, still holds.  Being pacifist is not a rigid formula for action.  Pacifism is the awakened conscience and the willingness to act on it sometimes alone, but preferably with some support.  The blessing is inherent in the action itself, and the surprise that follows.

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